Flash Review: The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse by Charlie Mackesy

By Maureen Tai, 7 February 2021

The Boy, the Mole, the Fox and the Horse is a unique graphic collection of profound, bite-sized meditations on friendship and kindness by illustrator, artist and author Charlie Mackesy. Framed as heart-to-heart conversations between the four titular friends, their friendship deepens with each page of Mackesy’s exquisite ink-and-pen illustrations, composed of masterfully executed undulating lines, bold flourishes and dreamy curlicues, sometimes with splashes of brooding watercolour, always with gorgeously handwritten text. The unnumbered pages are arranged so that readers of all ages can dip in, wherever they choose, alone or in company, and find solace, inspiration, wisdom and breath-taking beauty.
For ages 5 and up. (100 words)

The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins

By Anna, 14 July 2020

“Ladies and gentlemen, let the Seventy-fourth Hunger Games begin!” – Claudius Templesmith

IMG_2688When I started reading the Hunger Games, at first I thought it was going to be pretty boring. But soon after I got into it, I just kept wanting to find out what happened next. Continue reading

The Disappearances by Emily Bain Murphy

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By Anna, 29 February 2020

When Aila Quinn’s mother Juliet dies, Aila and her younger brother Miles are sent to her mother’s hometown, a town called Sterling. When they arrive at Sterling, they are sent to live with their mother’s childhood friend, Mrs Cliffton, and her family. But Sterling is not just a normal town. Continue reading

See You In The Cosmos by Jack Cheng

By Maureen Tai, 30 May 2019

“Do you have light brown skin like I do or smooth gray skin like a dolphin or spiky green skin like a cactus?” – Alex Petroski, posing a question to aliens.

img_5437.jpegAlex Petroski is eleven. He has a troubled mother, an absentee older brother and an adopted stray canine named after his hero, Carl Sagan. He is obsessed with rockets and he dreams of sending one into space. Inside the rocket, there will be an Ipod with his voice recordings about life on Earth, a gift to sentient beings outside of humankind’s own orbit. Alex himself is a gift. He is the infuriating yet loveable little brother you wished you had, and one of the most endearing, amusing and authentic voices in recent middle-grade realistic fiction. In See You in the Cosmos, Alex uncovers the heartbreaking truth about his past and his present, yet finds the courage, optimism and humour to face it all.  Continue reading